Strength Training for Cricket

Strength, Power and Athletic Training Specific to Cricket

Ask yourself a question – Is the strength and power-based training you are doing specifically tailored to the demands of cricket?

Or does it just look the same as what everyone else at the gym is doing?

Cricket is a unique sport with a specific combination of physical requirements – so why prepare for it with at best – general, and more often – poor training practices?

Admittedly, there is very little tailored information out there on strength and conditioning for cricket that is publicly available for the every day player. Most of the training methods that are specific to cricket are kept within the realms of professional teams, and what information does make its way out into the public is incomplete and unusable for the every-day cricketer.

And therein lies the necessity of and inspiration for Strength & Power Training for Cricket.

Finally a Cricket-specific focused training product and program.
The first and only of its kind!

Are you making these common mistakes?

  • No linkage between your specific goals and exercise selection
  • Performing bodybuilding-focused training
  • Using programs and exercises designed for other sports (like football or hockey)
  • Isolation exercises like bicep curls and triceps pulldowns
  • Performing with the same set and rep schemes every session
  • Not changing your program throughout pre-season and as the season progresses
  • Training primarily in 1 plane of movement
  • Spending wasted time on machine training like leg press and chest press
  • Implementing strength work and running based conditioning work as separate goals
  • Or worst of all – Not performing strength work out of the mistaken belief that it will slow you down.
If you are making these common training mistakes, even just a couple of them, then you are not maximizing the effectiveness of the time you are investing in your athletic conditioning for Cricket.

So why are these mistakes still so widespread?

The simple answer is that the knowledge and information just hasn’t been shared, and to a lesser extent, it probably isn’t understood properly by many people in the first place.

I believe that the fitness industry at large is greatly to blame. The fact is that the fitness industry itself has been driven greatly by the desires of bodybuilders and the desire for looks and aesthetics rather than function.

The wheel is slowly turning and more inroads are being made to correct the fallacy of athletes training with bodybuilder techniques, but once something is deeply ingrained its hard to get rid of.

What may be termed as functional in one sport won’t necessarily be of value to cricket.

If you are reading this, you likely:

  • Work full time
  • Are a student
  • Play local/development league level
  • Are a junior player
  • Can only dedicate time for a couple extra sessions a week

And in short, cricket is just another facet of your life to fit in around work/study and other commitments, rather than the central focus of your life that you are paid to do.

As a result, most of the information that may start to filter down from the elite level in terms of their programs and methodologies will be unusable to you or others who cant dedicate 30 hours a week to training and recovery anyway.

However what isn’t unusable for handball players – and applies to developing players at any level – are the principles of functional movement and athletic conditioning for the sport.

So why do the majority of cricket players still train like bodybuilders, train following a program from another sport, or simply not train at all?

Being a bodybuilder is no where near as tough as being a good athlete, let alone a good cricket athlete. Or more specifically, the training required to be a bodybuilder is nothing compared to the type of strength and power training required to be a more athletic and effective cricket player.

This is why there are so many people out there who are bodybuilders now. It doesn’t require much in terms of your training program. It can be very basic and generic, and largely dependent on your diet. Basically, it doesn’t matter what exercises you are doing, as long as you blast the hell out of the major muscle groups and eat a very strict diet you will see the results sooner rather than later.

To improve your rotation power and coordination, or your first 3-5 metres in an acceleration, or your ability to throw with power and accuracy, requires a lot of work, and more importantly a lot of the correct type of work, before you notice any improvements. Because after all, only your performance in matches or competitive match simulations will tell you whether you are improving. Simply looking in the mirror and seeing bigger quads and biceps won’t give much indication (although it may look good.)

So what physical improvements does being a better cricket player require?

  • Powerful single leg landing
  • Very effective and explosive rotation
  • Stable shoulders and functionally strong rotator cuff
  • Explosive first 2-3 steps
  • Decelerating quickly and efficiently
  • Changing directions with power and control
  • Full body strength for powerful batting and speed bowling
  • Core strength linking the legs to the torso and arms
  • Core and lower back strength
  • Stabilising every joint in your body when producing force (particularly when bowling at speed)
  • The ability to do these things over and over – not just once
  • Or any number of variances or combinations of the above
  • As well as the ability to be able to do these things over and over
  • And most importantly all these things with cricket-specific approach and application

Be honest: do you think your current strength training program is providing the necessary challenge on your body to actually be able to improve at any of these?

Could you explain to someone specifically how what you are doing is having a specific positive effect on one or more of these tasks?

Or are you still purely focusing on the size of your shoulders, chest and biceps as an indicator of your programs success?

Training the nervous system for physical performance is vastly different to training muscles to look bigger and better. If you think that having bigger muscles automatically means that they are now stronger and equipped for the physical nature of cricket think again!

Whilst a bigger muscle and therefore a bigger cross section of muscle fibres has the potential to be stronger, this will only be the case if the training techniques have had the appropriate effect on the nervous system. After all, muscles are controlled by the nervous system, and despite the fact that people tend to think mostly in terms of muscles when it comes to strength training, all gains that you make in performance are actually improvements in the performance of your nervous system and the nerves that feed your muscles for movement.

That’s right, in terms of functional strength training for cricket, your muscles per se are almost irrelevant. Yes you will develop some muscle mass performing a functional strength training program, but we are far more focused on the improvements made by your nervous system and the movement and strength that this builds. Remember, training to be a better cricket player requires training to move better (in a variety of ways.) And movement is controlled by your nervous system, not your muscles.

Cricket is about movement, not muscles, so lets focus our strength training accordingly.

Often times cricket players avoid strength work thinking it will slow them down or make them bulky – however this is only the case with the inappropriate practices we have mentioned.

The reality is, that strength is the underlying physical quality that is needed to be developed, before being able to make any genuine improvements is any other physical tasks.

So, which of these is most important to you?

Powerful torso rotation in batting

More powerful acceleration off the mark

Quicker direction change running between the wickets

Strong and stable shoulders when bowling

Powerful throwing

Controlling powerful landings (pace bowling)

As well as the ability to perform these tasks consistently to a high level throughout the duration of a match and indeed maintain them throughout a season!

Whatever the answer, the reality is, these expressions of power will not improve, without first improving the underlying platform of functional strength.

In the athletic development process, strength training is possibly the most important area because it is the underlying quality of so many other components.

This is because before you are able to express force quickly, you first must be able to express greater levels of force.

Finally a Cricket-specific focused training product and program.
The first and only of its kind!

So what EXACTLY does Strength & Power Training for Cricket include?

In-depth discussion of what exactly functional means in terms of preparation for cricket – made up largely of discussion points rarely discussed anywhere else.

A thorough physical needs analysis of cricket

A more detailed discussion on batting, bowling and fielding.

Detailed outline and description of the key exercises to build every training program for cricket around:

Upper Body – double arm AND even more importantly single arm strength AND power

Lower Body - double-leg and more importantly single leg strength and power

Rotational power and shoulder stability

By the end of simply reading this program, let alone performing it, not only will you have the blueprint to greatly improve your performance, but you will easily be able to identify useless exercises being performed around you by players with the same goals as you, as well as be able to explain in simple detail what ‘functional for cricket’ exactly means. You will also have absolutely no problem being able to explain why a leg press is useless for improving acceleration, and why just performing a heavier bench press will not instantly mean that you are better equipped to provide power in your bowl.

So what were those benefits again?

  • Powerful single leg landing
  • Very effective and explosive rotation
  • Stable shoulders and functionally strong rotator cuff
  • Explosive first 2-3 steps
  • Decelerating quickly and efficiently
  • Changing directions with power and control
  • Full body strength for powerful batting and speed bowling
  • Core strength linking the legs to the torso and arms
  • Core and lower back strength
  • Stabilising every joint in your body when producing force (particularly when bowling at speed)
  • The ability to do these things over and over – not just once
  • Or any number of variances or combinations of the above
  • As well as the ability to be able to do these things over and over
  • And most importantly all these things with cricket-specific approach and application

Everything from detailed information, to exercise description and demos, to detailed programming in the one complete and comprehensive resource - specifically tailored to cricket - both batting and bowling - rather than the disjointed and incomplete small amounts of information available elsewhere. Better yet - this is put together with the individual player in mind.

All of this and for less than half the price of 1 hour with a quality Athletic Performance coach.

Additionally, with a money back guarantee if you aren't impressed, there is a whole heap of upside and literally no potential downside.